Environment and Planning

Environment and Planning

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Aptly nicknamed Washaway Beach, in Pacific County, Washington, has long suffered from the most extreme coastal erosion along the whole U.S. West Coast. Now a relatively low cost defense is raising hopes among property owners and nearby cranberry growers.

Photos courtesy of Icicle-Peshastin Irrigation District.

Outside of Leavenworth, Washington, crews have been working on a dam in trouble. 

Chief Petty Officer John Matuska / U.S. Coast Guard

Specially trained rescuers have managed to free a whale that was tangled in fishing gear off the Washington coast. But they say the prognosis for the young gray whale is "guarded."

Ferry County Sheriff's Office - tinyurl.com/y89upps6

It’s a record year for flooding in northeastern Washington as spring runoff makes its way into the region’s rivers.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Tribes across the West are trying to restore their forests and grasslands to the way they were before white settlers arrived. Their goal is to return traditional foods like roots, huckleberries and big game.

But it’s a complex job.

Gary Wilson / USDA - tinyurl.com/yb562x5a

The Confederated Tribes of the Colville are celebrating an expansion of their sovereign rights. The federal government has granted them jurisdiction over water resources on tribal lands in northeastern Washington state.

CDC - tinyurl.com/y83ldq6m

As tick season reaches its peak in the Northwest, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control says diseases spread by tiny creatures like mosquitoes and ticks have tripled in the U.S. over the last 14 years.

ODFW - tinyurl.com/y9objgh3

A disease that affects wild elk populations has been spreading in Western Washington for a decade. Now, wildlife managers say they have found evidence of elk hoof disease east of the Cascades.

Steve Forrest / U.S. Fish & WIldlife Service - tinyurl.com/y8h7llpw

The last caribou herd in the Lower 48 is dwindling. According to aerial survey data collected earlier this spring, it’s down from 11 animals last year to just three.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

A federal watchdog agency said Wednesday that it's hard to prove that Hanford’s Waste Treatment Plant is safe. 

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