archaeology

Loren Davis / Oregon State University

An archaeological dig along the Salmon River in western Idaho has yielded evidence of one of the oldest human settlements in the Americas yet found.

Newly published findings from the excavation give impetus to a scientific rethinking of when and how the first people arrived in North America.

File photo of Amelia Earhart beneath the nose of her Lockheed Model 10 Electra in Oakland, California, in March 1937.
National Portrait Gallery / Smithsonian Institution

Photo analysis by a forensic imaging expert from suburban Seattle is backing up a new search for the pioneer aviator Amelia Earhart. Right now, a National Geographic expedition is at an uninhabited island in the South Pacific looking for Earhart's missing airplane.

Sarah Sterling / PSU

A legend about a great flood has been passed down through the centuries among the Klallam people on the north side of Washington's Olympic Peninsula. As re-told by Klallam elder Ed Sampson on a recording preserved by a University of North Texas linguist, the people noticed the fresh water turning salty -- a detail from which we infer a tsunami. 

Bob Hubner / WSU

Tests performed at Washington State University have found that people smoked tobacco in the Pacific Northwest going back more than a thousand years ago.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Some very special search dogs have been getting a workout in the Northwest. They’re trained to sniff out the remains of people buried as long as 9,000 years ago. This past week, their assignment was to find burials from the early Oregon Trail days.

File photo of Amelia Earhart beneath the nose of her Lockheed Model 10 Electra in Oakland, California, in March 1937.
National Portrait Gallery / Smithsonian Institution

An archaeologist from Eugene has just returned from an expedition to an uninhabited South Pacific island with new clues about the possible fate of Amelia Earhart. The pioneer aviator and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared 80 years ago—creating an enduring mystery and fascination.

Brittney Tatchell / Smithsonian Institution - tinyurl.com/j7q9g68

Genetic information from Kennewick Man shows the Bering Land Bridge may not have been the only route humans used to migrate to North America more than 10,000 years ago.





Ancient Bed Bugs Discovered In Oregon

Apr 11, 2017
Martin Adams

Bedbugs have been wreaking havoc in the Northwest for more than 10,000 years. The oldest fossilized evidence of the parasitic insects has been discovered in a cave in southern Oregon.

Edmund Fanning, 1838 / via Wikipedia

Shipwrecks along the Pacific Northwest coast number in the thousands. A handful have become the long-running obsessions of a cadre of shipwreck buffs.

John O'Brien / KUOW

The man who watches over the ancient bones of Kennewick Man will soon return them to five Northwest tribes — and he’s happy about that.

Brittney Tatchell / Smithsonian Institution - tinyurl.com/j7q9g68

The passage of a congressional bill that authorizes drinking and wastewater projects nationwide has Northwest tribes celebrating. An amendment to the bill means the 9,000-year-old human remains discovered near Kennewick, Washington, 20 years ago will be returned for final burial.

Michael Bisson

A Portland testing lab and a research team led by the University of Victoria have reset assumptions about the durability of biological evidence.

How durable? Wrap your head around 250,000 years.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

During the decade before the U.S. Civil War, a different conflict made a big impact on the future of the Oregon Territory. It's known as the Rogue River Indian War. But unlike the Civil War battlefields in the eastern U.S. or American South that receive hundreds of thousands of visitors annually, you’ll be hard pressed to tour -- or even find -- those battlefields.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

State officials are reporting the discovery of a second set of human remains near the cracked Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River in Eastern Washington state.