christmas trees

Casey Grogan is owner of Silver Bells Tree Farm, 400-acres of Christmas trees, in Silverton, Ore.
ANNA KING/NW News Network

 

The Christmas holiday is centered around peace. But an escalating marketing war for families’ hearts is developing between the real and fake tree industries.

 

The companies behind each type of tree are going at it with ad campaigns online, trying to convince you that their tree is better.

 

Anna King / Northwest News Network

You might be in the market for a Christmas tree right about now, but have you thought about what type of Christmas tree you want in eight years?

Believe it or not, it might be hard to find one. That’s because of a tree seedling shortage happening right now across the West.

Tom Norby

While you're focused on getting that last-minute costume and candy ready, Northwest tree farmers are sharpening their blades to cut and bale your Christmas tree.

But be warned: you might not get that noble fir of your dreams this year due to a Christmas tree crunch in the Northwest.

Tedder / Wikimedia

Several Northwest Christmas tree growers are trying to push containers full of evergreens through the Northwest’s delayed seaports.

Pacific Northwest Christmas Tree Association

Some of the world’s largest Christmas tree farms are right here in the Northwest. Some are harvesting about 20,000 trees a day.

Tedder / Wikimedia

Experts say there are at least three tests to give a Christmas tree before it gets strapped it to a car and dragged home so it doesn’t go “Charlie Brown” before Christmas Day.

Pacific Northwest Christmas Tree Association

If you buy a Christmas tree, part of its journey to your living room may involve a helicopter.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

The Christmas tree destined for the nation's capital is set to begin a cross-country roadtrip. But getting an 80-foot tree out of a national forest isn't quite like going to a U-cut.

Oregon Department of Agriculture

A trio of Oregon entomologists has a plum assignment this holiday season. They're heading to Hawaii to help spot pests trying to hitch a ride to paradise on the branches of Oregon-grown Christmas trees.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

Imagine, for a moment, that you're a stately Noble fir, ensconced among your peers amidst a lovely forest on the Oregon coast. Summers are mild, winters are rainy; pretty much everything you could ever want as a tree. You start to think that this might be a nice place to retire.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

SALEM, Ore. – The huge Christmas tree in the rotunda of the Oregon capitol building is back up again. Crews had to un-decorate and lower the 30-foot Noble Fir Tuesday morning to correct a fairly basic error made when the tree was raised the day before.

You know how when you buy a Christmas tree you're always warned to slice off a piece of the trunk so the tree can more effectively take in water? Well, someone overlooked that detail for the huge tree that graces the rotunda of the Oregon capitol.