gray wolf

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Threats of violence have caused Washington officials to cancel a series of in-person informational wolf management meetings.

“This is a time of high tension on wolf management issues all-around,” said Julia Smith, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife wolf coordinator. “Our own law enforcement staff recommended that we not have the meetings. We took that very seriously.”

Smith said she didn’t have details on exactly what threats were made. In a news release, department director Kelly Susewind said the tensions this summer were “on both sides of the issue.”

ODFW, 2017

An online map of wolf sightings from the public includes unconfirmed reports of wandering wolves from the Idaho border to the Pacific beaches, not to mention inside major cities such as Seattle and Tacoma.

The Oregon and Washington state wildlife departments welcome more eyes on the woods to monitor the spread of wolves, even though a good number of the citizen sightings are probably mistaken.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Conservation groups are offering a hefty reward for information leading to the poachers who killed two protected wolves in northeastern Washington state.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Washington’s House Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources hosted a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that proposes the partial delisting of wolves from the state’s endangered species list.

Eric Kilby / Flickr - tinyurl.com/gngh5n7

For the last two months, wildlife managers in Washington state have been shooting wolves in the Profanity Peak pack from a helicopter. The director of Washington’s Department of Fish and Wildlife authorized the killings back in August.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Stakeholders on all sides continue to grapple with a controversial management decision that would allow Washington state wildlife officials to exterminate an entire wolf pack in the Northeast corner of the state.

Herbert Lange / Flickr - http://tinyurl.com/hspp68u

When Washington state wildlife officials announced they would eliminate the Profanity Peak wolf pack, they were operating under a new management plan that came about after months of deliberation with various stakeholders ranging from livestock producers to conservation groups.

But some parties felt left out of the discussion.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said it has killed six wolves in the Profanity Peak Pack. Members of that pack are blamed for at least 12 cattle kills in the northeastern part of the state.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Wildlife managers in northeast Washington are removing a wolf pack known as the the Profanity Peak Pack following a number of cattle kills. The state faces opposition from tribes and pressure from locals as they proceed.

Eric Kilby / Flickr - tinyurl.com/gngh5n7

Since August 19, Washington state officials have been actively removing a wolf pack that roams the northeastern corner of the state. But it wasn’t clear the state had already started killing the animals.

Titleist46 / Wikimedia

Eleven packs of wolves have recolonized northeastern Washington. Now besieged politicians from that area are seriously proposing to relocate some of those protected wolves to western and southwestern Washington, where there are none.

Titleist46 / Wikimedia

Idaho biologists say the number of wolves is likely declining, but their count of breeding pairs of wolves -- a key number used to measure the health of the state’s wolf population -- has actually gone up.

Denali National Park and Preserve

Editor's note: find the latest information on this story here.

Idaho biologists say the state’s wolf population likely continued its decline in 2014 -- and that may be because few of them are breeding.

Wikimedia

Federal land managers are rescinding a permit that would have allowed a competition to hunt wolves and coyotes in Idaho.

Panel Finds Feds Didn't Use Best Science In Wolf Plan

Feb 7, 2014
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A new independent review finds the federal government used uncertain science when it proposed taking the gray wolf off the endangered species list across the Lower 48.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The US Fish and Wildlife Service wants to completely remove federal protections of gray wolves. Agency leaders announced the proposal Friday. The move would turn over gray wolf management to states. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Director Dan Ashe says gray wolves have recovered dramatically over the past decade.

"To see a species rebound from a century-long campaign of human persecution to flourish on the landscape again, is something we're all extraordinarily lucky to witness in our lifetimes,” Ashe told reporters in a conference call.

Wolf Count: Numbers Up in Oregon, Washingon; Down In Idaho

Apr 15, 2013
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

There are fewer wolves overall in the West, but Oregon and Washington's wolf populations continue to grow. That's according to the federal government's annual gray wolf tally, released Friday. As Jessica Robinson reports, the count has also revealed the initial effect of a controversial wolf hunting season in Idaho.

In the 2011-12 season, Idaho hunters and trappers killed nearly 400 wolves. Yet the population count decreased by just 63 animals, or 11 percent.

Killing Wolves Sparks Heated Debate In Washington Senate

Mar 8, 2013
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

OLYMPIA, Wash. – It would be easier to kill gray wolves that attack livestock or pets under a bill that passed the Washington Senate Friday. Currently, ranchers and property owners can’t kill protected animals, like wolves, without the permission of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. The bill sparked heated debate in the Senate.

Republican state Sen. John Smith said the measure would allow people to defend their animals, including the dog his son loves.

Wolf Trapping Season Set To Open In Idaho

Nov 14, 2012
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The gray wolf remains on state endangered species lists in Oregon and Washington. But in Idaho, the state opens wolf trapping season Nov. 15. In fact, Idaho plans to offer more tags than last year.

Idaho game managers hope sportsmen -– and women -– will help reduce the state's wolf population. Hunters and trappers bagged at least 375 wolves last year.

This year, that number may grow. Each hunter can get as many as 10 wolf tags and a trained trapper can get five.