landslides

Daniel Hutabarat / GEER

Last September, a magnitude 7.5 earthquake followed by a tsunami devastated a region of Indonesia, killing more than 4,300 people. Two Oregon State and University of Washington professors who surveyed the aftermath say the far-away disaster should elevate attention to quake-induced landslide risks here at home in the Pacific Northwest.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

The emergency is over for now at Rattlesnake Ridge near Yakima, Washington. The state says a major, sudden landslide is no longer imminent and Yakima County has lifted its evacuation order and told residents they can move back home near the slide area.

But that’s easier said than done.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

The emergency seems to be over for now at the slow-moving landslide at Rattlesnake Ridge near Yakima, Washington. The state has taken down the warning signs and lights on the highway below.

But for some, the drive is still nerve wracking. They’ve coined a phrase for driving quickly past the slide: “Shooting the Gap.”

Washington Department of Natural Resources

Starting Thursday, residents who were evacuated for the Rattlesnake Ridge landslide near Yakima, Washington, can go back home. That’s after a new study by a geology firm hired by the state said the slide could take years—or even decades—to come down.

Washington DNR - tinyurl.com/y843yqol

The landslide on Rattlesnake Ridge near Yakima, Washington, is likely going to be a slow one—it could take years or decades to fully come down. That’s the upshot of a new independent geology report commissioned by the state.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

The slow-moving landslide on Rattlesnake Ridge in Washington's Yakima Valley points to a larger problem plaguing the region—affordable housing. When residents were told to move away from their homes in the slide area, there were few places to go.

Washington DNR

Geology experts with Washington's Department of Natural Resource have quit making predictions for when a slow-moving landslide might break loose. About 20 acres of the hillside are in motion near the community of Union Gap, Washington. 

Washington DNR - tinyurl.com/y9bqjqzq

The landslide on Rattlesnake Ridge outside of Yakima, Washington, is turning into a slow grind. The land is moving at a constant 1.7 feet per week.

Anna King / n

After huge cracks appeared on Rattlesnake Ridge last year, geologists expect a landslide is coming at the mountain near Yakima, Washington. But they are having a hard time nailing down just when it will go.

Steven Mack / YouTube - youtu.be/7DATFoizswY

Emergency meetings are underway to discuss the threat of a possible landslide near Yakima, Washington. Dozens of federal, state, county and tribal officials are trying to work out a plan as this threat looms. 


Yakima Valley Emergency Management

Near the town of Union Gap in South Central Washington state, a massive chunk of Rattlesnake Ridge is moving ever more quickly.

Geologists say it will likely cause a landslide. And when does come fully down, it could take out roads, infrastructure and in the worst-case scenario, dam up the Yakima River.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Officials in Yakima County, Washington, are strongly urging residents living below a shifting mountainside near Union Gap to evacuate. 



A huge crack that appeared on Rattlesnake Ridge last year is beginning to widen.

Ian C. Bates

As heavy rains move into the Northwest, geologists are watching the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge. This summer’s wildfires have made slopes that are already prone to landslides even more treacherous.

Ian C. Bates

Now that the fall rains have begun, the fire danger at Multnomah Falls has declined. But Oregon’s popular gem still won’t open anytime soon.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Government experts are warning that landslides, rockfall and downed trees are likely in the Columbia River Gorge this fall and winter as the rains come. But one Gorge businesswoman worries that she can’t afford another natural disaster.

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries

Geologists for the state of Oregon are warning of the risk of major landslides in parts of the Columbia River Gorge that were hit by wildfires this year.

A new report released Thursday focuses on areas of the Gorge that are highly susceptible to landslides—which also happen to overlap with some of the areas hit by this year’s wildfires.

Washington Dept. of Natural Resources

Washington and Oregon geologists are warning residents of a higher risk for landslides than usual this week. Several storms moving through the region have quickly drenched steep slopes.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Hunkered low on the front deck of a yurt are two 20-somethings. The hut is plopped in the middle of a winding mountain canyon in Washington’s Methow Valley near the town of Twisp.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Kent Stokes, 28, can’t believe who survived the Carlton Complex wildfire.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Washington Governor Jay Inslee signed a state-of-emergency proclamation for Okanogan County Thursday. This, after severe rainstorms pounded the area this month.

Anna King

Maggie Garrett’s eight Arabian and Appaloosa horses whinnied and struggled last Thursday night in their pens, mud up to their bellies. Garrett had jumped in a truck with her neighbor to save the horses she calls her babies from drowning in a flash flood.

Wildfires Still Rage Amid Mudslides In Central Washington

Aug 22, 2014
InciWeb

The National Weather Service says slow-moving storms creeping through Central Washington could bring another round of mudslides this evening.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Residents are digging out from flooding that looks 300 yards wide in some places after mudslides brought down hillsides and torrents of mud ran down creeks outside of Twisp, Washington, Thursday night.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Aaron Dunlap started Friday morning with his car stuck in sand and a fish stuck in the dirt outside his cannabis farm. Dunlap is one of many people stuck digging themselves out today after landslides and flash floods near Twisp, Washington.

Washington State Department of Transportation

A section of U.S. Highway 12 in Washington state has reopened after a large mudslide hit Wednesday. But state workers are concerned about more possible slides there.

Snohomish County / Flickr

The deadly Oso landslide in March has resulted in a blizzard of legal claims against the state of Washington.

Snohomish County / Flickr

In the wake of the deadly landslide near Oso, Washington, there will be no immediate moratorium on logging around unstable slopes.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

President Obama told an audience of first responders at the Oso fire house in Snohomish County that he and First Lady Michelle Obama "grieve with you."

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

Snohomish County first responders are gathering in the Oso fire house for an appearance by President Barack Obama.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Flags are flying at half mast across Washington state this afternoon to honor victims of last month's deadly landslide.

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