race to alaska

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The starting gun fires bright and early Thursday morning for the fourth annual running of the maritime Race to Alaska. The 750-mile adventure marathon has been compared to the Iditarod but with a chance of drowning, being run down by a freighter, or getting eaten by a grizzly bear.

Courtesy Race to Alaska / Liv von Oelreich

An Orcas Island, Washington, man has become the first person to complete the Race to Alaska on a standup paddleboard. Karl Kruger stroked 750 miles solo from Port Townsend up the Inside Passage, crossing the finish line in Ketchikan Sunday evening. 

Tom Banse / NW News Network

You probably have seen standup paddleboarders along your local shoreline. But can you imagine paddling one of those boards for 750 miles up the Inside Passage to Alaska?

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The madcap flotilla of engineless boats entered in the Race to Alaska is safely moored in Victoria. Stage one of the 750-mile adventure race from Port Townsend, Washington, to Ketchikan is in the books.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

It was so memorable they had to do it again. The 750-mile Race to Alaska is back for a second year as 43 teams of sailors, rowers and paddlers prepare to set off from Port Townsend, Washington at 6 a.m. on Thursday.

Leila Kheiry / KRBD-FM

A steak-knife fight on the high seas has captivated Northwest yachting fans for the past day.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The first stage of the inaugural 750-mile Race to Alaska -- a non-motorized endurance race up the Inside Passage -- has thinned the field.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

At 5 a.m. Thursday morning, a wide range of catamarans, sloops, kayaks and ocean rowboats will launch from Port Townsend, Washington, in the inaugural Race to Alaska.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

A souped-up paddle board, custom rowing craft and high performance, carbon fiber sailboats are just some of the eye-catching entries in the inaugural Race to Alaska.