wolverine

Steve Kroschel / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Conservation groups are vowing to again challenge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s decision not to add wolverines to the Endangered Species List. The groups say wolverines are iconic species in high mountain snowy habitat, which is greatly threatened by climate change. 

Ten conservation groups had requested the federal government list the elusive predators.

Cascades Carnivore Project

Wolverines are the largest members of the weasel family, but they look more like small bears with bushy tails.

Conservation groups say the animals need to be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Ten groups want to force the federal government to protect the elusive wolverines. 

The groups estimate there are around 300 wolverines left, sparsely scattered across the Mountain West, including Idaho, Washington and Oregon. Their young depend on snowy, high altitude habitat that could disappear as the climate warms.

Steve Kroschel / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The wolverine is not going on the threatened species list after all. Tuesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced federal protected status for the fierce and rare carnivore is unwarranted at this time.

WDFW

A federal threatened species listing for the wolverine is looking increasingly unlikely.