wolves

WDFW

Washington state government marksmen now have clearance to go out this weekend to shoot a wolf from a pack that has been preying on cattle in the Colville National Forest. A judge on Friday declined to extend a temporary stay on the killing won by several environmental groups last week.

Eric Kilby / Flickr - tinyurl.com/gngh5n7

Last month, a Washington state resident was fined more than $8,000 for poaching three wolves in 2016. DNA evidence linked him to three separate kills, but other poaching cases remain unsolved. 

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Conservation groups are offering a hefty reward for information leading to the poachers who killed two protected wolves in northeastern Washington state.

D. Kopshever / National Park Service

There could be big changes on the horizon for the way the state of Washington manages its wolf population to minimize the conflicts between wolves and livestock.

Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

Washington state’s department of Fish and Wildlife will kill members of a wolf pack that is causing problems for livestock in Stevens County.



D. Kopshever / National Park Service

Ranchers in northeastern Washington state can turn out their cattle to graze on the Colville National Forest June 1. Last year a statewide battle broke out over how best to manage wolves and cattle together.

In the end, half of one wolf pack was shot from a helicopter and some ranchers received death threats.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wolves mostly make the news when they are in conflict with livestock and that’s part of the reason they were once removed from the Western landscape. But a new study shows wolves play an important role, whether we like it or not.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Washington’s House Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources hosted a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that proposes the partial delisting of wolves from the state’s endangered species list.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A bill in a committee of the Washington House of Representatives would exempt some personal information relating to the state’s wolf management efforts from public disclosure.

Supporters say it will keep those who work directly with wolves safe. Opponents are concerned about the loss of transparency.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

After a tense year for wolf management in Washington state, the Department of Fish and Wildlife is making some crucial changes. Members of the Wolf Advisory Group emphasized the importance of those changes at a meeting near Olympia Wednesday.

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