wolves

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The federal government says it will remove endangered species protections for gray wolves in the Lower 48. The move will reduce protections for the predators in the western two-thirds of Washington and Oregon. 

“Today’s action reflects the Trump administration’s continued commitment to species conservation based on the parameters of the law and the best scientific and commercial data available,” Interior Secretary David Bernhardt said in a statement.

WA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is asking state wildlife officials to “significantly reduce” the killing of wolves involved in livestock conflicts.

 

In a letter to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Kelly Susewind, Inslee asked that the state increase efforts to change guidelines that dictate when a wolf can be lethally removed.

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Threats of violence have caused Washington officials to cancel a series of in-person informational wolf management meetings.

“This is a time of high tension on wolf management issues all-around,” said Julia Smith, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife wolf coordinator. “Our own law enforcement staff recommended that we not have the meetings. We took that very seriously.”

Smith said she didn’t have details on exactly what threats were made. In a news release, department director Kelly Susewind said the tensions this summer were “on both sides of the issue.”

WA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

A bill in the Washington state House of Representatives would create a wolf sanctuary on Bainbridge Island. And while the bill’s sponsor, Republican Joel Kretz, knows it’s unlikely to even get a hearing, he said he introduced it to make a point.

WDFW

Washington state government marksmen now have clearance to go out this weekend to shoot a wolf from a pack that has been preying on cattle in the Colville National Forest. A judge on Friday declined to extend a temporary stay on the killing won by several environmental groups last week.

Eric Kilby / Flickr - tinyurl.com/gngh5n7

Last month, a Washington state resident was fined more than $8,000 for poaching three wolves in 2016. DNA evidence linked him to three separate kills, but other poaching cases remain unsolved. 

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Conservation groups are offering a hefty reward for information leading to the poachers who killed two protected wolves in northeastern Washington state.

D. Kopshever / National Park Service

There could be big changes on the horizon for the way the state of Washington manages its wolf population to minimize the conflicts between wolves and livestock.

Washington Wildlife Officials To Kill Wolves Again

Jul 20, 2017
WA Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

Washington state’s department of Fish and Wildlife will kill members of a wolf pack that is causing problems for livestock in Stevens County.



D. Kopshever / National Park Service

Ranchers in northeastern Washington state can turn out their cattle to graze on the Colville National Forest June 1. Last year a statewide battle broke out over how best to manage wolves and cattle together.

In the end, half of one wolf pack was shot from a helicopter and some ranchers received death threats.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wolves mostly make the news when they are in conflict with livestock and that’s part of the reason they were once removed from the Western landscape. But a new study shows wolves play an important role, whether we like it or not.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Washington’s House Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources hosted a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that proposes the partial delisting of wolves from the state’s endangered species list.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A bill in a committee of the Washington House of Representatives would exempt some personal information relating to the state’s wolf management efforts from public disclosure.

Supporters say it will keep those who work directly with wolves safe. Opponents are concerned about the loss of transparency.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

After a tense year for wolf management in Washington state, the Department of Fish and Wildlife is making some crucial changes. Members of the Wolf Advisory Group emphasized the importance of those changes at a meeting near Olympia Wednesday.

WDFW

Over the summer, wildlife managers killed seven wolves in the Profanity Peak pack in northeast Washington. The wolves had been preying on cattle grazing on the Colville National Forest. Under Washington’s wolf management plan, the trigger for so-called “lethal action” is when a wolf pack attacks livestock four or more times in a year.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Stakeholders on all sides continue to grapple with a controversial management decision that would allow Washington state wildlife officials to exterminate an entire wolf pack in the Northeast corner of the state.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

In the past month, wildlife officials have shot six wolves from a helicopter in the Colville National Forest in northeast Washington state. That’s likely to come up during a two-day work session for members of the state’s Wolf Advisory Group that begins Wednesday.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said it has killed six wolves in the Profanity Peak Pack. Members of that pack are blamed for at least 12 cattle kills in the northeastern part of the state.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Wildlife managers in northeast Washington are removing a wolf pack known as the the Profanity Peak Pack following a number of cattle kills. The state faces opposition from tribes and pressure from locals as they proceed.

Eric Kilby / Flickr - tinyurl.com/gngh5n7

Since August 19, Washington state officials have been actively removing a wolf pack that roams the northeastern corner of the state. But it wasn’t clear the state had already started killing the animals.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Washington’s Department of Fish and Wildlife plans to kill an entire wolf pack in the northeast corner of the state. The decision comes after at least 12 cattle were killed in the area.

Titleist46 / Wikimedia

Eleven packs of wolves have recolonized northeastern Washington. Now besieged politicians from that area are seriously proposing to relocate some of those protected wolves to western and southwestern Washington, where there are none.

Idaho Wolf Control Board Reports 31 Wolves Killed In 2014

Feb 3, 2015
Wikimedia

Thirty-one wolves were killed in the first six months of Idaho’s new Wolf Depredation Control Board.

Titleist46 / Wikimedia

Idaho biologists say the number of wolves is likely declining, but their count of breeding pairs of wolves -- a key number used to measure the health of the state’s wolf population -- has actually gone up.

Denali National Park and Preserve

Editor's note: find the latest information on this story here.

Idaho biologists say the state’s wolf population likely continued its decline in 2014 -- and that may be because few of them are breeding.

Wikimedia

Federal land managers are rescinding a permit that would have allowed a competition to hunt wolves and coyotes in Idaho.

Wikimedia

A new study out of Canada reveals a surprising side-effect that hunting may have on wolves.

Denali National Park and Preserve

Federal land managers in Idaho project minimal environmental damage from allowing a predator hunting derby to take place in the north-eastern part of the state.

visitsunvalley.com

The resort town of Ketchum, Idaho, is asking the state to back off on killing wolves. They say it’s bad for business.

Panel Finds Feds Didn't Use Best Science In Wolf Plan

Feb 7, 2014
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A new independent review finds the federal government used uncertain science when it proposed taking the gray wolf off the endangered species list across the Lower 48.

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