wwii

Tom Banse / NW News Network

A World War II army veteran in Great Britain achieved world renown earlier this year with a charity walk to raise money for British health care workers on the front lines of the pandemic. The achievement went viral -- in a good way -- and inspired another pandemic feat by a 100-year-old U.S. Army veteran across the ocean in Portland, Oregon.

Obon Society

Pandemic stay-at-home orders gave lots of households extra time for spring cleaning. Some people rediscovered World War II artifacts, including inscribed Japanese flags taken as souvenirs by American soldiers from Pacific battlefields.

Now, aging veterans and their descendants are attempting to return memorabilia to the families of their former enemies ahead of a milestone anniversary. Next Wednesday, September 2, marks 75 years to the day since the Japanese surrender ceremony that ended World War II.

Courtesy of the artist

 

Walking into the vast B Reactor chamber at the Hanford Site, Tri-Cities musician Denin Koch felt the pull of history and innovation.

“It’s like the feeling you get when you go up the first hill of a rollercoaster. You walk into the room and you face the big reactor face. You look at it, and you can kind of confront science and history and politics all at once,” Koch says, four years later.

Obon 2015

A pair of World War II veterans from the Pacific Northwest and their escorts will return 70 inscribed Japanese flags Tuesday directly to the prime minister of Japan.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Seven Pacific Northwest veterans of World War II leave for Tokyo Thursday. They're carrying 70 captured Japanese flags to return for the 70th anniversary of the end of the war.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Some aging veterans of World War II are embarking on one more mission. The object is to return Japanese flags taken as war souvenirs from Pacific battlefields.

Stacey Camp

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, U.S. government officials rounded up Japanese-Americans and sent them to harsh, ill-equipped camps. Now, the National Park Service has announced $3 million in new grants to help preserve that important history.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

June 6 is the 70th anniversary of the Allied invasion of Western Europe. And this year’s D-Day will be especially meaningful for World War II veterans in Oregon as the state's long-awaited World War II Memorial will open on that day.