nursing homes

Courtesy Sarah Scarfo

For nearly half a century, people with severe brain injuries have found a home in a nursing facility housed in a Swiss Chalet-style former tuberculosis hospital in Snohomish, Washington.

Delta Rehabilitation Center began as a traditional nursing home in 1959, but found its calling serving brain-injured clients in 1975 after the owners’ 20-year-old son suffered a debilitating traumatic brain injury in a car crash.

Over the decades, Delta Rehab developed a reputation as one of the few facilities in Washington willing and able to serve the unique, long-term care needs of these often younger and sometimes difficult-to-manage patients.

But now, after years of financial challenges, the third generation, family-run nursing home is preparing to close its doors. The facility’s staff was notified of the impending closure Wednesday afternoon.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

In response to a rash of nursing home closures in Washington, a Republican state senator is calling for an increase in Medicaid reimbursement rates and other steps to stave off additional closures.

“We are in a crisis of skilled nursing facilities and beds,” said Sen. Steve O’Ban, a Pierce County Republican.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

Keith Akada thought Keiro Northwest Rehabilitation and Care Center in Seattle’s Central District would be the final resting place for his mother, Mieko, who has Alzheimer’s disease.

The nursing home opened in 1976 to serve aging issei, first-generation Japanese Americans, who faced exclusion and racism. For decades, it’s provided culturally sensitive care to the area’s Asian and Pacific Islander community.