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Assault Charges Dropped Against Seattle Soccer Star Hope Solo

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Nicole Miller
/
Flickr
File photo of U.S. soccer star Hope Solo

A municipal court judge in suburban Seattle has dismissed domestic violence charges against home-grown soccer superstar Hope Solo.

That lifts a cloud over the U.S. national team's goalkeeper as she prepares for the upcoming Women's World Cup.

The misdemeanor assault charges stem from when Hope Solo was arrested by Kirkland police in June at her half-sister’s house. Police had been called to the suburban Seattle residence in response to a 911 call from Solo's nephew who said she was "going crazy and hitting people."

Solo steadfastly maintained her innocence. Her defense attorney in fact asserted in court filings that she was the victim, not the perpetrator. Attorney Todd Maybrown won dismissal of the charges after Solo's half-sister and nephew refused to answer relevant questions during one pre-trial deposition and failed to appear for a follow up interview.

Solo is in California, training for the World Cup with the U.S. Women's National Team. In a statement, the two-time Olympic gold medalist said she is "so happy and relieved" to put "one of the most difficult and emotionally draining times" of her life behind her. Solo thanked her coaches, teammates and the U.S. Soccer Federation for standing by her.

Last fall, some critics saw a double-standard at work when U.S. Soccer allowed Solo to continue to play while NFL players accused of domestic violence received suspensions.

Tom Banse covers national news, business, science, public policy, Olympic sports and human interest stories from across the Northwest. He reports from well known and out–of–the–way places in the region where important, amusing, touching, or outrageous events are unfolding. Tom's stories can be found online and heard on-air during "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered" on NPR stations in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.